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Buy Second Hand Macbook [PORTABLE]



I follow a couple of Facebook group for Apple users. They post all sorts of questions and dilemmas that sometimes gives me ideas of what to write about. One thing I have noticed that comes up a lot is people asking whether they should buy a second hand Mac, or for help with a second hand Mac that they have just bought.




buy second hand macbook



Now there is second hand and there is second hand. A wise person who wanted to save money would buy a refurbished Mac from Apple (or another company that carries out refurbishments and has a good reputation). Read: Why you should buy a refurbished Mac.


I want to buy a 2020 macbook pro which has apple care plus (3yrs) but no sales receipt. I just want to know whether I can use apple care plus if there is any issue with macbook. I can not transfer the apple care plus to my name as the seller doesnt have the sale receipt. When I check the apple coverage it showing apple care plus valid for next 3 years.


My correspondent also didn't specify why, specifically, he was interested in MacBooks rather than Windows laptops. It could be his kids prefer MacOS, or it could be that they want some features or applications unique to Mac laptops. Since graphics and video production are some of the Mac's strengths (and Chromebook's weaknesses), I'm going to assume that the kids need some video and graphic capability -- and machines that can handle that load.


The scam potential is there as well for Craigslist and Facebook Marketplace, but since you're likely to be able to put your hands on the machine before you buy, you stand a better chance. Of course, in these days of the pandemic, going face-to-face with a seller, even if you're both masked, carries its own risk. Additionally, to do a purchase this way, you have to be very comfortable with your ability to validate product model year and features, and the seller has to be willing to let you spend time with the machine.


If you aren't sure which version your Mac is running, Apple has a handy support page with step-by-step instructions for finding not only what OS the device is running, but also the version number (handy for keeping track of updates) and what hardware it's using (which is great for confirming the seller is being truthful about the build they're trying to get you to buy).


Turn on your Mac and immediately press and hold these four keys together: Option, Command, P, R. Release the keys after about 20 seconds. This clears user settings from memory and restores certain security features that might have been altered. Learn more about resetting NVRAM.


The seller formated the drive before sending it to me, when i turned it off i got to the first time installation wizard. There's no apple id associated to the macbook and the only user is the one i did create in the wizard and has no icloud account associated whatsoever.


The language of the second-hand market can be confusing, so be sure to check out our comparison between refurbished, used, and pre-owned devices. Of note here is that OWC mainly sells used MacBooks. These are second-hand devices that have undergone some level of inspection.


However, shopping with OWC is a grade above buying any second-hand device. As the company specializes in computer upgrades, you can choose to customize your second-hand MacBook. After you've selected a model, there are options relating to disk size, memory, and the second-hand condition.


Third-party sellers are key to Amazon's success. That's also the case with the Amazon Renewed store. The majority of the items for sale here are not sold by Amazon, but are inspected and refurbished by third-party sellers. Amazon implements standards, though, so you can still be sure any second-hand item purchased through this store will be in good condition.


If it's peace of mind you're after, the Apple Certified Refurbished store should be your first choice. However, the other sites here all offer a unique take on the second-hand device that may better suit your needs.


That said, you must do your research before committing to a second-hand MacBook. Despite the many upsides, there are potential pitfalls you need to keep an eye on. Be sure to familiarize yourself with what you need to know when buying a refurbished Mac.


finally, we bout the acceptable MacBook and after a while we realized something goes wrong with it. Because there must be more important elements to check about the hardware and insight of the units. So I started to learn more about buying a second hand MacBook after that bad experience and listed some important elements to check them carefully. Here are some of them:


Keep an eye out for MacBook Pro models that are listed as refurbished or renewed. This usually means a part has been replaced, either by the seller or Apple itself. Make sure you read the details of what was replaced and why. This is often a good way to find a cheaper MacBook Pro that has been fixed and is excellent working order or has had a part replaced with a better, newer equivalent. Either way, refurbished is a good way to go if you want to balance the performance of a new machine with the price of a second-hand one.


Buying a second hand MacBook is a great way to save money while getting your hands on a MacBook that is in full working order. Although a refurbished MacBook can sometimes show signs of wear, it will be in full working condition and should operate almost as good as it did new.


Yes! As long as you purchase your second hand or refurbished MacBook from a reputable supplier it should be completely safe to use. Affordable Mac safety test all Apple MacBooks before they are put on sale and offer a 1-year warranty on all Apple products to give you peace of mind.


This is why you need to know how to find the battery cycle count data, particularly if you are about to purchase a second-hand Mac notebook. That way you know why what you are buying seems to be a bargain and can plan in advance for a battery replacement.


When you take the iPhone in hand and it shows a Lock Screen to enter the device passcode, it means the device is not yet erased and most likely Find My (and Activation Lock) is still enabled. Ask the previous owner to turn off Find My and erase the device. After that, you can buy it.


Beware of miscreants! There were cases when people bought a second-hand device and then found it locked with the Find iPhone options (only for iOS 6 and later). After that, the villains would blackmail their victims: e.g., tell them they have their stolen phone and threaten to go to police. To make the device work again you can reset settings to default before buying.


About a week ago I decided to trade my 3 year old iMac in using Apple's online trade-in system. The estimate said it would be worth $720. After I sent it in, they revised the estimate down to $150 because they said there was "screen damage". I can assure you that there was no screen damage when I sent it to them because I used the iMac over 8 hours per day 365 days per year for 3 years. Was it damaged during shipping or was this a scam to make money off me? I lost 80% of its value due to this alleged broken screen. They are offering me to send the Mac back at no cost if I don't accept the $150 offer. Should I take the offer? Considering I lost nearly all the value due to the screen, does that mean the screen is the only component that they are really paying me for? Is the screen worth 80% of the entire computer? I contacted Apple and they said they can't do anything because this is all handled by a subcontractor. OOPS, EDIT: my current iMac is 3 years old, this was my 6 year old iMac, sorry.


22july2013 said: About a week ago I decided to trade my 3 year old iMac in using Apple's online trade-in system. The estimate said it would be worth $720. After I sent it in, they revised the estimate down to $150 because they said there was "screen damage". I can assure you that there was no screen damage when I sent it to them because I used the iMac over 8 hours per day 365 days per year for 3 years. Was it damaged during shipping or was this a scam to make money off me? I lost 80% of its value due to this alleged broken screen. They are offering me to send the Mac back at no cost if I don't accept the $150 offer. Should I take the offer? Considering I lost nearly all the value due to the screen, does that mean the screen is the only component that they are really paying me for? Is the screen worth 80% of the entire computer? I contacted Apple and they said they can't do anything because this is all handled by a subcontractor.Yes! Take it back!First, if the machine works well for you then it is worth far more than a mere $150. (Apple uses a generic algorithm to grade trade-ins and minor problem is treated the same as a major one)Second, a 3 year old Mac in decent condition sells for a LOT more than $150 -- probably about 3 or 4 times that!Apple needs to reopen their stores more fully. I've been having trouble with my Airpod pros but it takes over a week to get an appointment at my Apple Store. So, I've been trying to troubleshoot it over the phone with Apple Support so, right now, they are shipping me a new case. But, having a technician look at it hands on would have been much better for both Apple and myself. Likewise, your screen problem would likely have been caught immediately at the Apple Store saving everybody a lot of time, effort, grief and money.


22july2013 said: About a week ago I decided to trade my 3 year old iMac in using Apple's online trade-in system. The estimate said it would be worth $720. After I sent it in, they revised the estimate down to $150 because they said there was "screen damage". I can assure you that there was no screen damage when I sent it to them because I used the iMac over 8 hours per day 365 days per year for 3 years. Was it damaged during shipping or was this a scam to make money off me? I lost 80% of its value due to this alleged broken screen. They are offering me to send the Mac back at no cost if I don't accept the $150 offer. Should I take the offer? Considering I lost nearly all the value due to the screen, does that mean the screen is the only component that they are really paying me for? Is the screen worth 80% of the entire computer? I contacted Apple and they said they can't do anything because this is all handled by a subcontractor. OOPS, EDIT: my current iMac is 3 years old, this was my 6 year old iMac, sorry.Was there any type of shipping insurance when you sent it to Apple?Did they send you pictures of the damage?Was there any way to speak to someone about how they received your iMac who can determine if this screen damage was from shipping, or go into more detail about what they found? 041b061a72


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